King Charles: Prince Harry's memoir is the least of the monarch's concerns, here's why

New research suggests that millennials are no longer as optimistic about the Royal Family as they used to be, meaning King Charles may have to work harder to win over the younger generations.

King Charles: Prince Harry's memoir is the least of the monarch's concerns, here's why
© Max Mumby/Indigo /Getty Images
King Charles: Prince Harry's memoir is the least of the monarch's concerns, here's why

Research suggests that contrary to popular belief, millennials aren’t becoming more conservative as they age, which seems to translate to lower support for the Royal Family.

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Declining support from younger generations

John Burn-Murdoch, a journalist for the Financial Times, revealed that millennials are ‘by far the least conservative 35-year-olds in recorded history’. The research showed that millennials are 15 points less conservative in the UK and the US, which the journalist believes could be linked to the shared economic hardship following the 2008 recession.

Although this research had nothing to do with the Royal Family per se, it could still threaten King Charles and the monarchy’s future. The support of Gen Z and millennials, to a lesser extent, for the monarchy has been gradually declining. And if Gen Z follows suit and holds onto their liberal values, then an existential crisis could await King Charles and the monarchy, according to Newsweek.

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After the passing of Queen Elizabeth II, 32% of 18 to 24-year-olds still believed the monarchy was good for Britain compared to 27% who thought it was bad. 33%, more than double the figures of 2015, wanted an elected head of state.

Graham Smith, chief executive of the anti-monarchy campaign group Republic, claimed in a press release:

Charles and William are not men we would elect as head of state, if we were given the chance, yet there they are. We have people at the top of our society most of us would actively vote against in a free and fair election, because the King and heir would not withstand the scrutiny and challenges that comes with that contest.

King Charles could face a rocky road ahead

Graham Smith told Newsweek:

The sort of comments that people make about the royals on social media or in the press, you wouldn't get away with that ten years ago about the queen.

The King faces many challenges as he begins his reign, from disgraced Prince Andrew to accusations of racism and colonialism.

Read more:

King Charles and Queen Camilla’s affair might spark trouble for them this year, here’s why

King Charles may have 'sown the seeds of the destruction' of monarchy, according to Queen's chaplain

King Charles' security reportedly on high alert due to 'vulnerability of the royals'

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With Burn-Murdoch’s belief that the shared economic hardship of a recession has something to do with millennials remaining more liberal, King Charles could be in trouble as Britons are facing the cost-of-living crisis.

Especially as the King prepares for a lavish coronation while some Britons wonder how they will survive the rest of the winter.

Smith believes:

The Coronation has all the constitutional significance of an Elton John concert.

However, despite the increase in Gen Z wanting an elected head of state, the overall support for the abolition of the monarchy remains at 25%. Older generations still primarily view the monarchy as a positive, and 60% of Britons, all ages combined, still support the King. Meaning the monarchy still has a good few years before the change in public opinion becomes a real threat to its existence.

Sources used:

- Newsweek: The Polling Trend That Could Bring Down King Charles' Monarchy

- Republic Press Release: Myth of monarchy shattered. "Britain deserves better"

- Republic Press Release: No increase in support for royals despite new king

Prince Harry and Prince Andrew could be axed as Counsellors of State if King Charles amends law Prince Harry and Prince Andrew could be axed as Counsellors of State if King Charles amends law