Having a TV In Your Bedroom Is Killing Your Sex Life
Having a TV In Your Bedroom Is Killing Your Sex Life
Having a TV In Your Bedroom Is Killing Your Sex Life
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Having a TV In Your Bedroom Is Killing Your Sex Life

Could TV in bed be a real mood-killer? Television could indeed widen the distance between a couple if it’s misused. However, it could also produce lovely shared moments and under no circumstances prevent you from snuggling up together.

TV isn’t necessarily ideal for producing conversations in relationships. It can be difficult to drag your eyes and attention away from it once it’s turned on. When it’s introduced into the marital bed, it can also become libido’s worst enemy.

Jacques Waynberg, sexologist at Paris’ Institute of Sexology, said:

A couple only works by establishing rituals, including erotic ones. TV kills the latter, because it appears to disrupt them.

Psychosociologist Patricia Delahaie agreed with him on the subject, and stated that:

Anything which takes emphasis away from your partner, sharing and skin on skin can be threatening for couples. TV turns you diverts attention from your partner, and you both find yourselves alone.

Reduced sexual activity

The distance which TV establishes between a couple could have a real impact on the frequency of sexual interactions. For Jacques Waynberg:

Facing a screen is bound to decrease time for erotic activity, because you’re busy watching it.

Whereas the bedroom is a place which is supposed to bring couples closer together, television could disrupt this intimate space and could even become 'an excuse for avoiding having sex.' What’s more, it adds in factors like hyperconnectivity (using lots of electronic applications) or stress, which stop us from listening to our bodies and desires. The bedroom, which should be a shield against these factors, may in turn become one of them when you introduce a TV.

However, we shouldn’t completely demonise televisions, which may bring couples together if used correctly. Talking or having physical contact in front of a programme, for example, are two ways of encouraging couples to become close, and not killing the mood. The important thing is to communicate this to your partner so that you can both take full advantage of it.

By Lola Bee

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