New Zealand schools to roll out sanitary products nationwide

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announces that New Zealand schools will be providing free sanitary products nationwide in the aim to end period poverty.

New Zealand schools to roll out sanitary products nationwide
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In her ongoing battle against period poverty, supremely-awesome PM of New Zealand, Jacinda Ardern, announced a new policy that will supply all schools with free sanitary products.

A triumph for pupils across the country

The initiative first took off last year with 15 schools across the country providing their pupils with free sanitary productsbut the next phase in the rollout program is finally coming into effect. In studies conducted across the country, figures showed that one in 12 young people were missing school because they did not have adequate access to sanitary products which prompted the Labour government to take action.

Even more concerning is the fact that New Zealand's numbers also reflect the state of affairs for period poverty in many parts of the western world. The new initiative will cost the country NZ$25 million for the next four years.

Ardern said:

Providing free period products at school is one way the Government can directly address poverty, help increase school attendance, and make a positive impact on children's well-being.

She added:

We want to see improved engagement, learning and behaviour, fewer young people missing school because of their period, and reduced financial hardship amongst families of participating students.

Following in the foot steps of Scotland

Last November, Scotland became the first country in the world to provide free universal access to period products. Monica Lennon, the Scottish Labour who spearheaded the mission said:

This will make a massive difference to the lives of women and girls and everyone who menstruates. There has already been great progress at a community level and through local authorities in giving everyone the chance of period dignity.

She continued:

There has been a massive change in the way that periods are discussed in public life. A few years ago there had never been an open discussion of menstruation in the Holyrood chamber and now it is mainstream