Queen Elizabeth II's firm stance following Prince Philip's death

On 7 April, Elizabeth II mourned the death of her beloved husband. The 95-year-old Queen has since decided to fill her diary for the coming months.

Queen Elizabeth II's firm stance following Prince Philip's death
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She has lost her 'rock,' the one who accompanied her for so many years. On 7 April, Elizabeth II said goodbye to her beloved husband, Prince Philip. During a moving funeral at Windsor Castle a few days later, the 95-year-old monarch, sitting alone on a bench, could not hide her sorrow and shed a few tears. But far from feeling sorry for herself, Her Majesty was quick to return to business. To keep busy so as not to wallow.

A Queen chomping at the bit to get back to work

Under quarantine at Windsor Castle and in mourning, the Queen's schedule has rarely been so light as during lockdown. Over the past fourteen months, Elizabeth II has been forced to cut back considerably on her engagements due to the health crisis. While she has tried to adapt to these changes, by holding a large number of video conferences, the Queen is now determined to get back out into the field quickly, as Royal Central reports. She is reportedly eager to get out and meet the British people again.

Elizabeth II not about to abdicate to Prince Charles

Last weekend, Elizabeth II travelled to Portsmouth to board the Royal Navy's flagship, HMS Queen Elizabeth. An outing that heralds many others. A meeting is planned with the new US President Joe Biden, as well as other world leaders, ahead of the forthcoming G7 summit in the UK on 11-13 June. A week in Scotland is also on her agenda. Although there were rumours that Queen Elizabeth II would be stepping down after the death of her husband and/or after her 95th birthday, the sovereign is proving that this is not in her plans.

While a regency is slowly being put in place, there is no question of the Queen abdicating. Dick Arbiter, former Palace press secretary, said:

She took the oath in 1947, she took the oath in 1953 at her coronation. She is very devout, she is the supreme authority of the Anglican Church, and she has pledged herself to God for every day of her life, which means until her last breath.

And Catherine Mayer, Prince Charles' biographer, confirmed:

The last thing she would do is abdicate. Either she will die on the throne, or if she is declared incompetent, there will be a regency until she dies.

So Prince Charles will have to wait his turn again, unless the British decide otherwise, and acclaim his eldest son, the beloved Prince William...