Blocked Nose, Cough, Loss Of Taste: Coronavirus Symptoms Can Differ Depending On Your Age And Gender
Blocked Nose, Cough, Loss Of Taste: Coronavirus Symptoms Can Differ Depending On Your Age And Gender
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Blocked Nose, Cough, Loss Of Taste: Coronavirus Symptoms Can Differ Depending On Your Age And Gender

Male, female, young, old… According to a study published in the Journal of Internal Medicine, COVID-19 symptoms aren’t the same for everyone.

Not everyone handles illness in the same way - the coronavirus is no exception.

Although it is common for sufferers of COVID-19 to experience headaches and a loss of smell, a study published on April 30 in the Journal of Internal Medicine proves that this virus can manifest itself in a variety of different ways. Depending on your age and gender, the onset and severity of symptoms could vary greatly.

Different symptoms depending on age

Young patients are generally affected by ENT problems, meaning those affecting the ears, nose and throat. Elderly patients tend to develop other symptoms such as a fever, severe fatigue and a loss of appetite.

Different symptoms depending on gender

The most common symptoms noted in women in terms of the coronavirus are a loss of smell, headaches and a stuffy nose. On the other hand, men have been found to be more likely to develop a cough and a fever.

A blocked nose: the most common symptom

The study, carried out with the help of more than 1,400 patients, showed that headaches and a loss of smell were the most common symptoms, affecting 7 in 10 people in the study.

Other common symptoms for people suffering from COVID-19 are:

  • Blocked nose (67.8%)
  • Cough (63.2%)
  • Fatigue (63.3%)
  • Muscle pain (62.5%)
  • Runny nose (60.1%)
  • Loss of taste (54.2%)
  • Fever (45.4%)

An inquiry carried out five European countries (France, Belgium, Italy, Spain and Switzerland) confirmed that a loss of smell was very specific to COVID-19. Foch Hospital explained:

This means that it’s more probable that SARS-CoV-2 has caused a loss of olfactory nerve function, rather than an inflamed nasal lining, which leads to the loss of smell.
By Stacey Williams

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