Measles: Symptoms, Treatment, Vaccination And Everything You Need To Know
Measles: Symptoms, Treatment, Vaccination And Everything You Need To Know

Measles: Symptoms, Treatment, Vaccination And Everything You Need To Know

During your antibody test, did you realise that you were not protected against measles and you are pregnant? Ohmymag informs you about the risks and treatments of measles.

Measles And Pregnancy

1. Symptoms of measles in pregnant women: The symptoms of measles are the same in everyone. The main symptoms are a moderate fever (between 38° and 39°) and a rash. Often these signs are accompanied by flu-like symptoms and conjunctivitis. Sometimes small white pimples may appear inside the mouth (Koplick's syndrome).

Be careful if you are not vaccinated or if you have never had measles! Often, these symptoms are treated lightly because they are difficult to differentiate from an allergy. Measles is a normally benign disease, but it can be dangerous in pregnant women. Indeed, measles increases the risk of miscarriage and premature delivery. In addition, it can worsen and develop into a lung condition that can endanger the mother. Always let any doctor you see know that you are pregnant.

2. Treatment of measles in pregnant women: Each case of measles is different, only a doctor can decide the appropriate treatment for their patient. In general, an expectant mother with measles will be hospitalised for fetal monitoring.

One of the proposed treatments is a series of intravenous injections of gamma globulins. These are antibodies that can help the weakened immune system of the pregnant woman to fight the disease.

3. Vaccine against measles and pregnancy: Vaccination is strongly discouraged during pregnancy. If you are not immunised against measles while you are pregnant, take extra precautions to avoid people who have measles.

If you are planning on trying to conceive, do not hesitate to do a preconception consultation with your doctor or gynecologist. They will prescribe a blood test that will measure your antibodies for measles but also for all other harmful infections for you and your future baby. If you are not immune, you can avoid the risk of measles by getting vaccinated before getting pregnant.

Also remember to vaccinate your children from nine months against measles, you will avoid a painful disease and participate in the eradication of this infection.

By Will Armstrong
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