Molly-Mae Reveals Photos of ‘Very, Very Large Strawberry Birthmark’
Molly-Mae Reveals Photos of ‘Very, Very Large Strawberry Birthmark’
Molly-Mae Reveals Photos of ‘Very, Very Large Strawberry Birthmark’
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Molly-Mae Reveals Photos of ‘Very, Very Large Strawberry Birthmark’

Love Island star Molly-Mae Hague has shared previously unseen photos of herself as a young child, when she had a large strawberry birthmark on her head.

After a fan asked her about the ‘dent’ on her hairline,Molly-Maeopened up in her latest Youtube video about having a large birthmark on her head as a child. Today, the small brown mark on Molly-Mae’s hairline is barely noticeable but the star revealed that it is the trace of a prominent birthmark she was born with.

‘Very large strawberry birthmark’

As she showed a series of photographs of herself as a toddler and young child, Molly-Mae revealed:

I actually was born with a very, very large strawberry birthmark… It was bright red, it was super large, it stuck out of my head quite far. It was a very, very large one to be honest. It's quite shocking, I didn't realise.
Youtube/MollyMaeHague

Although the birthmark faded as she got older, Molly-Mae revealed that she had her birthmark removed before starting secondary school as she ‘wasn’t confident about it’ and her parents feared that she might be targeted by bullies. Luckily, she says she never had any trouble from other kids about it.

Despite the fact she got her birthmark removed, Molly-Mae encouraged others to always be proud of their birthmarks, saying:

Birthmarks are cool. Own them, rock them. The only reason I got mine removed was because it was in such a prominent area, right on my head.

What is a strawberry birthmark?

Strawberry birthmarks, which are also known as haemangiomas, are raised birthmarks that form from blood vessels. They are usually red but may also look blue or purple. They appear soon after birth and usually shrink and disappear by the age of seven. Strawberry birthmarks are more common in girls, premature babies and twins.

By Johanna Garner

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