This Is How Valentine’s Day Is Celebrated Around The World

This Is How Valentine’s Day Is Celebrated Around The World

Bouquets of flowers, restaurant, chocolates, gifts... For Valentine's Day, everyone has their own way to surprise their loved one. If you thought that your technique was the most original, that’s because you have never heard of these somewhat astonishing traditions related to the day of love.

To ensure that Valentine's Day is special every year, you must be imaginative and not hesitate to leave your comfort zone to surprise your partner. A candlelit dinner or a sumptuous bouquet of roses could be enough for you beloved, however some traditions require more involvement, or conversely contradict the common image that we have of this romantic day. These traditions could also fill in if you’re not feeling inspired...

Gender swapped gift giving in Japan

In Japan, it is women who usually give men gifts on February 14th. They often give chocolates to their superiors or colleagues. A month later, on March 14th, it is the men's turn to do the same thing.

Little love poems for the Danes

In Denmark, it is common to secretly send ‘gaekkebrev,’ love poems usually accompanied by a snowdrop, on Valentine's Day. These letters are often signed with small dots. If the recipient discovers who is hiding behind the poem, they are given an Easter egg.

The holiday is celebrated together in South Africa

In South Africa, Valentine's Day is celebrated on the beaches, in the streets or in the discotheque. Women display the name of their companion on their clothes to make it clear that they are taken.

Valentine's Day arrives earlier in Wales

The Welsh celebrate the day of lovers on January 25th. They do not offer chocolates or flowers but wooden spoons often decorated with hearts and padlocks.

In Scotland, you do not necessarily know who your Valentine is

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The first person of the opposite sex you meet becomes your Valentine in Scotland. Restaurant invitations and gifts are totally optional. It is indeed a symbolic tradition, and in no way is it commercial.

Check out the video above for more on Valentine's traditions around the world! 

Rob Mitchell
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